Sunday, 10/17/2021
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Bảo tàng lịch sử Quốc gia

Vietnam National Museum of History

Ink analysis reveals Marie Antoinette’s letters’ hidden words and who censored them
  • 07/10/2021 11:46

Ink analysis reveals Marie Antoinette’s letters’ hidden words and who censored them

The analysis reveals whether the doomed French queen spilled state secrets or bon mots

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'Connection with the past': AI to find and preserve Europe's historical smells
  • 04/10/2021 12:47

'Connection with the past': AI to find and preserve Europe's historical smells

There's no sense quite like smell to trigger an emotional response. One whiff of a damp basement, a dusty blanket, a ripe strawberry, or a steaming bowl of pasta can instantly evoke feelings and memories that have their roots in the distant past. Yet when it comes to learning about bygone times, we barely give a thought to the vapors that once prevailed—galleries and museums are the domain of artworks that appeal to our sense of sight, rarely reminding us of how things smelled—fragrant or foul—when our forebears walked the earth.

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Radiocarbon-dating an early minting site: the emergence of standardised coinage in China
  • 24/09/2021 15:04

Radiocarbon-dating an early minting site: the emergence of standardised coinage in China

Abstract:
The origins of metal coinage and the monetisation of ancient economies have long been a research focus in both archaeology and economic history. Recent excavations of an Eastern Zhou period (c. 770–220 BC) bronze foundry at Guanzhuang in Henan Province, China, have yielded clay moulds for casting spade coins. The technical characteristics of the moulds demonstrate that the site functioned as a mint for producing standardised coins. Systematic AMS radiocarbon-dating indicates that well-organised minting developed c. 640–550 BC, making Guanzhuang the world's oldest-known, securely dated minting site. This discovery provides important new data for exploring the origin of monetisation in ancient China.

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Museums are in a race against time to keep plastic art from falling apart
  • 23/07/2021 15:04

Museums are in a race against time to keep plastic art from falling apart

Leanne Tonkin still remembers the ruined coats. She was doing a fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute in the mid-2010s when she saw a red mackintosh from the 1960s. The raincoat was so rigid it could stand up on its own, as though inhabited by a ghost. Another mackintosh was hardly recognizable as clothing. “You could make out a button on it, but it was completely melted,” she says.

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How ancient people fell in love with bread, beer and other carbs
  • 02/07/2021 11:04

How ancient people fell in love with bread, beer and other carbs

Well before people domesticated crops, they were grinding grains for hearty stews and other starchy dishes.
• Andrew Curry

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How did Neanderthals and other ancient humans learn to count?
  • 07/06/2021 17:08

How did Neanderthals and other ancient humans learn to count?

Archaeological finds suggest that people developed numbers tens of thousands of years ago. Scholars are now exploring the first detailed hypotheses about this life-changing invention.

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Neanderthals carb loaded, helping grow their big brains
  • 14/05/2021 14:54

Neanderthals carb loaded, helping grow their big brains

Here’s another blow to the popular image of Neanderthals as brutish meat eaters: A new study of bacteria collected from Neanderthal teeth shows that our close cousins ate so many roots, nuts, or other starchy foods that they dramatically altered the type of bacteria in their mouths. The finding suggests our ancestors had adapted to eating lots of starch by at least 600,000 years ago—about the same time as they needed more sugars to fuel a big expansion of their brains.

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Research discovers malaria devastating humans far earlier than expected
  • 25/03/2021 10:05

Research discovers malaria devastating humans far earlier than expected

Changes discovered in bones have helped provide new answers about malaria. Credit: University of Otago

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How do scientists figure out how old things are?
  • 14/01/2021 09:09

How do scientists figure out how old things are?

How does dating (scientifically speaking) work?

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