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Vietnam National Museum of History

10/05/2018 23:55 87
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Uroja worship object, silver, 11th – 12th centuries AD., Champa culture

Uroja worship object, silver, 11th – 12th centuries AD., Champa culture.

This is an expression of the Linga–Yoni symbol. In the Champa sculpture art, after the 11th century AD, especially during the period of the Thap Mam style, Yoni is depicted in the form of breasts (uroja) and represents feminity. Therefore, Linga–Yoni are also called Linga– Uroja. This Uroja worship object is composed of two parts: the two-layered Linga in octagonal and cylindrical shapes, of which the cylindrical part is the most important. It symbolizes the Shiva God and is covered with gold. The Uroja part is in the form of a Yoni pedestal which is round and carved with lotus petal bands surrounded by round breasts. The base is a square shape. The Linga–Yoni symbols are widely worshipped in India and in other countries that received and developed Hinduism, including those in Southeast Asia. In the Champa culture, Linga–Yoni represent reproduction (Linga means “yang” and is expressed in the form of a penis, while Yoni represents “yin” and is depicted in the form of a female vagina), and at the same time is a symbol of Shiva – the God of Creation.


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